Saturday, 7 August 2010

Isle of Wight: Carisbrooke Castle (part 2)

Carisbrooke Castle - Great Hall and Constable's Lodging

After walking around a bit in the grounds of Carisbrooke Castle for a while, we decided to hurry inside as it was beginning to rain.  The two-storey building to the left is known as the Great Hall and was built in the late thirteenth century.  The Great Hall would have been the heart of the castle in medieval times and most people ate there.  The three story building in front is the Constable’s Lodging which was built in 1397 and is in the medieval style. 

Carisbrooke Castle - Charles I's bedroom Carisbrooke Castle MuseumCarisbrooke Castle Museum Carisbrooke Castle Museum - East Cowes Castle ClockCarisbrooke Castle Museum

The Great Hall now houses the Carisbrooke Castle Museum which is spread over a couple of floors.  Much of the museum is dedicated to King Charles I who was imprisoned in the castle in the last year of his life. The story of King Charles I is fascinating and I would really recommend visiting the Wikipedia link above.  In modern terms, Charles I thought he had a God-given right to extort money and privileges from his subjects and that his power should be absolute.  A bunch of people called the Parliamentarians (or Roundheads) disagreed and this lead to the First and Second Civil Wars.  Charles I escaped to the Isle of Wight in 1647 but was imprisoned and finally returned to London for his execution.  His daughter, Princess Elizabeth, died in Carisbrooke Castle in 1950 after catching a chill.

With the rain clearing up somewhat, we took a walk around some of the more functional areas of the castle.  This is where much of the work would have been done in the past and the buildings were incredibly well preserved.

Carisbrooke Castle - Well House

This is the Well House and the well’s treadmill is still powered by Carisbrooke’s famous donkeys.

Carisbrooke Castle - famous Carisbrooke donkeysCarisbrooke Castle - famous Carisbrooke donkeys

They were rather cute little things and apparently they are given lots of rest and not overworked.  They looked to be happy enough.

Carisbrooke Castle - Coach House Tea Room

This is the old coach house which is now a tea room.  We were having far too much fun “castle hopping” to stop for tea though as our next stop was the Keep and Motte.

Carisbrooke Castle 28

With a quick snap of the south east tower, we moved over to the north eastern corner of the castle for the most awesome views yet.  More on that next time!

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17 comments

  1. What an amazing castle. I really wanted to visit but was outvoted in favour of Fountain World and Arreton Barns :-(

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  2. I love it. As you said, it looks incredibly well maintained, in its original state. My favourite building is the Well House with the donkeys — I know it sounds very childish of me :) After feeding the donkeys, I would go see the pictorial collections. I read thanks to your link that there's some Turner artwork, and I find especially intriguing the footwear exhibit. I look forward to the next series!

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  3. Longing for a European holiday. Thanks for sharing your adventure:)

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  4. Hi Emm,
    Gorgeous photos! I also love your pics of Turkey, lucky you! I've been dreaming of going to Istanbul. I have friends there...but there's always some excuse :(
    Where do find the time to travel so often? I wish I could do it. I'm jealous.
    Thank you for sharing these amazing pics.
    Cheers!
    Claudia
    http://www.claudiadelbalso.blogspot.com

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  5. The photos kind of take me back to years when life was less complicated and more grounded. Love those houses. But I'll say this - those beds are way too small for a grown person. We were told when we visited Shakespeare's birthplace that people slept upright. Must have been uncomfortable.


    So what are you doing this weekend?

    Thanks for visiting Norwich Daily Photo and leaving your comment. Come visit again tomorrow!

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  6. There is something about those old four poster beds that I just love...the amazing craftsmanship and how you can just close the curtains and shut out the outside world...

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  7. You not stopping for tea, I must have heard you wrong. lol Another great tour of this splendid medieval abode.

    Is the date right? "Princess Elizabeth, died in Carisbrooke Castle in 1950 after catching a chill"

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  8. Looks lovely. Another place to add to my must visit list

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  9. Wow!!! Lovely!!!
    Another on my never-ending list of places to visit!!

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  10. Enchanting! I will have to add this location to my must-sees. Your photos are absolutely lovely.

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  11. Emm, I soooo love your blog. Brings back many fond memories of our time in England. Thank you also for your nice comments on my blog. Cheers!!

    Julie....The Empress' mommy

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  12. King Charles was another crooked Scottish Stewart Royal only interested in himself and his wealth who met a bitter end. Am I the only one thinking 'poor little donkeys'?
    Beautiful old castle.

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  13. Hi Emm! Lovely! but look at that sky... ;)

    Blogtrotter Two is back to the sea... ;). Make the most of it and have a spectacular week ahead!

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  14. i adore castles. great you got to have a good nosey inside. that south east tower looks intruiging too. i imagine they prob blocked that off for safety as usual? boo!

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  15. Carisbrooke castle ... I just love it *sigh*

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  16. You've put me in the mood for a good castle outing! In the rain, no less ;-)

    Lovely tour, Emm. Thank you!

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  17. Awesome! Thanks for sharing.

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